Justin Vela

Posts Tagged ‘Yedikule gardens

Turkey: From Gezi Park to Yedikule Gardens

leave a comment »

A Turkish couple looks at a construction project near Istanbul's central Taksim Square.

A Turkish couple looks at a construction project near Istanbul’s central Taksim Square.

Turkey’s economy is heavily dependent on construction. But it generally comes with deconstruction.

Istanbul’s central Gezi Park was supposed to be torn down to build a replica of an Ottoman-era mosque. Now, some of the Yedikule gardens, which date back to the 6th Century, will be destroyed for a municipality built park.

Critics claim that the gardens’ demolition, coming on the heels of the Gezi Park protests, are another example of the primacy of government construction schemes over all other considerations.

“When you do something like this, it’s like cutting [down] the trees in Gezi Park. It’s the same concept,” said Alessandra Ricci, an Italian archeologist who studied the site and criticized UNESCO for not speaking out about the gardens’ destruction. “The authorities are destroying the city’s cultural heritage.”

“Overall, the municipality are project-oriented people, but they don’t really care about what is lost,” agreed Gunhan Borekci, an assistant professor of history at Istanbul’s Sehir University who attended the Yedikule demonstration. At least one garden was already partially covered in dirt.

Read more 

What is the Turkish government and their contractor buddies thinking tearing down important symbols of this ancient city?

Profits and some hazy idea of renovation, most likely. Along with a strong “we know best” attitude.

Maybe not all the vegetable gardens around Istanbul’s old city walls will go. There are also many gardens outside the walls.

It’s the ones inside the walls that are now facing destruction, despite their centuries of existence.

But where does the destruction of Istanbul’s cultural symbols end?

Living in Istanbul often feels like one big construction site. The sounds of it echo throughout the day.

There’s money being made, yes. And many buildings are unsafe and need renovation.

Yet, there’s something deeply wrong in this scheme when weeks of  protests, sparked by a government renovation project, are not ending.

The determination and energy of these protests is increased by the uncompromising approach of the government.

At the same time, not all of Turkey is against the government projects. Some residents of the Yedikule area believe the building of a park will increase the value of their properties.

Today is the first day of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month, and hundreds of anti-government demonstrators were allowed back into Gezi Park, the most in weeks. Hopefully all remains calm.

But in the end the protests that gripped Turkey are not about Gezi Park or the Yedikule gardens. They are about an entire system that these citizens believe should change.

Advertisements

Written by Justin Vela

July 9, 2013 at 7:44 pm